How Medicaid Affects Behavioral Health: Coverage, Expansion and Reform

Medicaid expansion has already had a huge impact on whether mental health needs are treated in certain populations. That may not be at the top of all the stories lately about the U.S. House of Representatives passing its replacement of the Affordable Care Act and the Senate considering its own version. But it is a significant piece of our country’s behavioral health puzzle. The expansion brought coverage to many low-income adults without children, a group that had largely been left out of Medicaid programs.

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Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe concentrates his practice in the areas of administrative litigation, government relations, and other regulatory matters. Matt formulates comprehensive political and public relations strategies on a broad range of federal and state policies. He drafts and monitors legislation, intervenes directly with legislative, executive, and local officials, and appears before state and federal executive agencies. Within his administrative litigation practice, Matt advises and counsels health care providers subject to federal and state regulatory actions.

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Federal Health Care Leaders Write Governors About New Direction for Medicaid

While much of the attention related to health care this week is focused on our nation’s capital, all 50 state governors have received a letter from recently confirmed U.S. Health & Human Services Secretary Tom Price and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma.  The letter begins by noting the challenges facing Medicaid.  The authors describe Medicaid expansion as “a clear departure from the core, historical mission of the program” and as creating “an incentive to deprioritize the most vulnerable populations.”  The letter then commits to working with expansion states (31 plus the District of Columbia) and non-expansion states (19) on a “solution that best uses taxpayer dollars to serve the truly vulnerable.”

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Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe concentrates his practice in the areas of administrative litigation, government relations, and other regulatory matters. Matt formulates comprehensive political and public relations strategies on a broad range of federal and state policies. He drafts and monitors legislation, intervenes directly with legislative, executive, and local officials, and appears before state and federal executive agencies. Within his administrative litigation practice, Matt advises and counsels health care providers subject to federal and state regulatory actions.

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Providing Insight on March 30: ACA-Related Litigation and Impact of New Administration at AHLA Institute on Medicare and Medicaid Payment Issues

Join the American Health Lawyers Association in Baltimore for the Institute on Medicare and Medicaid Payment Issues. Parker Poe’s Matt Wolfe will be providing an overview of ACA-Related Litigation and Impact of New Administration at a joint luncheon sponsored by AHLA’s Behavioral Health Task Force and AHLA’s Health Care Reform Task Force on March 30.

Read more here.

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Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe concentrates his practice in the areas of administrative litigation, government relations, and other regulatory matters. Matt formulates comprehensive political and public relations strategies on a broad range of federal and state policies. He drafts and monitors legislation, intervenes directly with legislative, executive, and local officials, and appears before state and federal executive agencies. Within his administrative litigation practice, Matt advises and counsels health care providers subject to federal and state regulatory actions.

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Feb. 27 Webcast: The 60 Day Rule & What It Means for Your Home Health & Hospice Agency 

February 27, 2017 | 3:00-4:30pm EST

Under the Affordable Care Act, any health care provider that identifies an overpayment from Medicare or Medicaid has a legal requirement to return the overpayment. The Act requires that the overpayments must be reported and returned by the later of 60 days after the date identified or the date any corresponding cost report is due. This has left providers confused about what is meant by identifying an overpayment and how far back providers should “look back” when investigating possible overpayments. In 2016, CMS published final regulations clarifying how Medicare Part A and Part B providers are expected to audit for and fully investigate potential overpayments.

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Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe concentrates his practice in the areas of administrative litigation, government relations, and other regulatory matters. Matt formulates comprehensive political and public relations strategies on a broad range of federal and state policies. He drafts and monitors legislation, intervenes directly with legislative, executive, and local officials, and appears before state and federal executive agencies. Within his administrative litigation practice, Matt advises and counsels health care providers subject to federal and state regulatory actions.

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OIG Releases 2017 Work Plan

On November 10, 2016, the Office of Inspector General (“the OIG”) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“DHHS”) released its 2017 Work Plan.  Published annually and updated throughout the year, the Work Plan identifies the OIG’s key areas of focus as it carries out its mission of protecting the integrity of programs within DHHS.  The OIG is charged with ensuring the integrity of more than 100 programs administered by DHHS, including those within the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Institute of Health. The OIG Work Plan summarizes the OIG’s current activities – comprised of both new and revised activities — along with information regarding previously identified activities that have been completed, postponed, or cancelled.

The Work Plan highlights new and continuing priorities applicable to various provider types, including hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, home health, clinical laboratories, physicians and other health professionals, medical equipment suppliers and manufacturers, pharmaceutical manufacturers and other providers and suppliers.

The 2017 Work Plan is available here.

The following is a sampling of some of the new and ongoing efforts highlighted in the Work Plan:

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Amanda Hayes

Amanda Hayes

Amanda Hayes counsels clients in connection with mergers and acquisitions, divestitures and other business matters, with a particular focus on the health care industry. She regularly serves as lead counsel on acquisitions and divestitures, guiding the client through deal structuring, due diligence, drafting, negotiation and closing. In addition to health care, Ms. Hayes’ mergers and acquisition experience includes a variety of industries, such as manufacturing, retail, automotive, contract research, environmental remediation, engineering and construction supply.

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U.S. Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Implied Certification Using a Fact-Intensive Materiality Standard

The legal landscape for False Claim Act (“FCA”) cases recently shifted when the United States Supreme Court announced its decision in Universal Health Services, Inc. v. U.S. ex rel Escobar, No. 15-7, 2016 WL 3317565 (U.S. June 16, 2016) (“Escobar”).  Whistleblowers (also known as relators) and health care providers alike have been eagerly awaiting this decision.  Although each side hoped for a bright-line ruling, what they got was something of a mixed bag.  In Escobar, the Court resolved a split in the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals over the application of the “implied certification theory” of False Claims Act liability.Read More

Annette K. Ebright & James C. Lesnett Jr.

Annette Ebright is a litigator practicing in the areas of Complex Civil Litigation, Government Investigations, White Collar Criminal Defense and Criminal and Regulatory Compliance. Jamie Lesnett focuses his practice on complex business litigation and government investigations. Mr. Lesnett has extensive experience litigating complex business disputes in federal and state courts throughout the United States, including litigation involving contract disputes, business torts, unfair competition and trade secret misappropriation.

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N.C. DHHS Announces Timeline for LME/MCO Mergers

In a letter dated March 17, 2016, Richard Brajer, Secretary of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, announced that the Local Management Entity-Managed Care Organization (“LME/MCO”) merger process would be moving forward beginning this summer.  Currently, there are eight LME/MCOs that manage Medicaid- and State-funded mental health, intellectual and developmental disability, and substance abuse services through a federal waiver.  After the newly announced mergers, these eight LME/MCOs will be organized into four regional organizations to include: an East Regional LME/MCO (consisting of  a merger between Trillium Health Resources and Eastpointe); a North Central Regional LME/MCO (consisting of a merger between Cardinal Innovations and CenterPoint); a South Central Regional LME/MCO (consisting of a merger between Alliance Behavioral and Sandhill Center); and a Western Region LME/MCO  (consisting of a merger between Smoky Mountain Center and Partners Behavioral Health).

The Department believes these mergers will decrease the administrative burden on providers, who are currently required to follow the requirements and deal with the credentialing and billing systems of as many as eight LME/MCOs and will result in better coordination of care and scalability of services. However, providers who have previously experienced these types of transitions know that such a massive process will almost certainly have some negative short-term effects on business and clinical operations.  Providers should look to actively engage in the planning and transition process as much as possible over the coming months and keep a close eye on potential pitfalls that may arise during this process.  Parker Poe will be closely monitoring this processing going forward as well and are happy to work with providers to best manage these uncertain times in the life of their business.

Robb Leandro

Robb Leandro

Robb Leandro assists his client with a broad range of legal issues relating to health care, administrative law and public policy. His legal practice focuses on helping health care providers navigate the minefield of regulations that they face in their practices. Robb routinely assists his clients with issues including Medicaid and Medicare regulations; Medicaid and Medicare audits; Certificate of Need Applications and litigation; licensure, surveys, and certification issues; and HIPAA and privacy laws. Robb also provides counsel to health care providers with complex government contract procurement issues.

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Challenging Medicaid Prepayment Review

When the North Carolina Division of Medical Assistance (“DMA”) decides to place a Medicaid provider on prepayment review, it can be the equivalent of a death sentence for a small business.  The primary problem is that there are few avenues to appeal the decision to be placed on prepayment review, even when there is little or even no justification for DMA’s decision.  Prepayment review then becomes a waiting game reducing cash flow and overwhelming providers with a paper chase gotcha game. Although the initial decision to place a provider on prepayment review cannot be challenged, this does not mean that a Medicaid provider has no options to challenge the prepayment review process.

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Varsha Gadani

Varsha Gadani

Varsha Gadani focuses her practice on the health care industry. Her clients include hospitals, physicians, behavioral health care providers, long-term care facilities, and other providers. Prior to joining Parker Poe, Ms. Gadani served as Assistant Counsel at the North Carolina Medical Society (NCMS). In this role, she performed a variety of legal functions for the NCMS. She monitored and analyzed emerging state and federal health law issues and advised physicians on health policy matters.

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How Medicaid Providers Can Challenge Rate Cuts in the Wake of Armstrong v. Exceptional Children’s Center

The Federal Lawyer, a national magazine by the Federal Bar Association, just published an article by one of Parker Poe’s health care attorneys.   The article looks at the implications of a recent Supreme Court decision and explores how Medicaid providers can still challenge rate cuts.

The article is available here.

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe concentrates his practice in the areas of administrative litigation, government relations, and other regulatory matters. Matt formulates comprehensive political and public relations strategies on a broad range of federal and state policies. He drafts and monitors legislation, intervenes directly with legislative, executive, and local officials, and appears before state and federal executive agencies. Within his administrative litigation practice, Matt advises and counsels health care providers subject to federal and state regulatory actions.

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Parker Poe Hosts Health Care Symposium on Supreme Court Decisions


Raleigh, NC –  On July 16, 2015, Parker Poe hosted a Health Care Symposium co-sponsored by the North Carolina Society of Health Care Attorneys, the Federal Bar Association’s Health Law Section, and the Federal Bar Association’s Eastern North Carolina Chapter.

The Symposium was a review of the United States Supreme Court’s decisions impacting health care in the 2015 term. Panelists reviewed the Court’s opinions and their legal and practical implications. The Symposium was designed for health care providers, lawyers, policy makers, and others interested in health law and policy.

Matt Wolfe, an attorney  in Parker Poe’s Raleigh office, moderated the Symposium’s panels.  Matt was joined by Kimberly Cogdell Boies of NCCU Law; Catherine Dunham, Elon Law; Mark Hall, Wake Forest Law; Joan Krause, UNC Law; Jane Perkins, National Health Law Project; Barak Richman, Duke Law; Richard Saver, UNC Law; and Don Taylor, Duke Public Policy. Click here for a link to the video of the session.

If you would like further information about topics discussed, please contact Matt Wolfe at 919-835-4647 or mattwolfe@parkerpoe.com.

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe

Matt Wolfe concentrates his practice in the areas of administrative litigation, government relations, and other regulatory matters. Matt formulates comprehensive political and public relations strategies on a broad range of federal and state policies. He drafts and monitors legislation, intervenes directly with legislative, executive, and local officials, and appears before state and federal executive agencies. Within his administrative litigation practice, Matt advises and counsels health care providers subject to federal and state regulatory actions.

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