Can Employers Continue Post-Accident Drug and Alcohol Testing?

On January 1, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) new recordkeeping and reporting rule took effect. The main impact of this rule requires employers to electronically file annual injury and illness reports, which will be placed in a publicly accessible database. However, buried in the final rule’s explanation last year, OSHA questioned the ability of employers to conduct automatic post-accident drug or alcohol testing.

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Jonathan Crotty

Jonathan Crotty

Jonathan Crotty has been a successful counselor and problem solver for large and small employers in the Carolinas and beyond for over 20 years. He heads Parker Poe’s Employment and Benefits practice group and represents employers in all aspects of the employment relationship, from hiring to discharge. Mr. Crotty provides guidance to employers as they navigate the complex array of laws and regulations applicable to the employment relationship, including employment discrimination laws, OSHA compliance, FMLA, and wage and hour matters. If employers face legal or administrative claims resulting from their employees and employment practices, he defends and resolves those disputes in line with the client’s goals and expectations.

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EEOC Settlement Reminds Healthcare Employers of Limits on Mandatory Vaccinations

The policy seemed straightforward. A hospital required all employees to receive seasonal flu vaccinations based on its assessment of the dangers of influenza to patients with compromised immune systems. The hospital went further, providing an exemption from the policy for employees with medical or religious reasons for avoiding the vaccinations. Nevertheless, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently announced that it had reached a $300,000 settlement with the hospital based on its claims that the vaccination policy violated the religious rights of six terminated employees under Title VII.

The EEOC claimed that in practice, the Pennsylvania hospital rejected religious claims for exemption from the flu vaccine, while routinely granting medical exemptions. The settlement specifically prohibits the hospital from requiring that employees seeking a religious exemption from the vaccinations provide notes from clergy certifying the religious basis for the objection. In general, Title VII prohibits employers from inquiring into the basis for or sincerity of the employee’s religious practices or beliefs.

The settlement does allow the hospital to continue denying vaccination exemption requests if it can prove undue hardship. This is a difficult standard, requiring the employer to demonstrate something close to certainty of harm in the event that the exemption is granted. In the hospital’s case, undue hardship could arise for example, with employees whose jobs requires regular and close contact with patients known to have compromised immune systems.

The EEOC’s position obviously provides employees who simply prefer not to get vaccinated an avenue to claim a questionable religious exemption to the requirement. Absent clear evidence that the employee does not hold a sincere religious belief supporting the accommodation request, the employer has little recourse other than to determine whether the accommodation presents the undue hardship allowed by the EEOC.

Jonathan Crotty

Jonathan Crotty

Jonathan Crotty has been a successful counselor and problem solver for large and small employers in the Carolinas and beyond for over 20 years. He heads Parker Poe’s Employment and Benefits practice group and represents employers in all aspects of the employment relationship, from hiring to discharge. Mr. Crotty provides guidance to employers as they navigate the complex array of laws and regulations applicable to the employment relationship, including employment discrimination laws, OSHA compliance, FMLA, and wage and hour matters. If employers face legal or administrative claims resulting from their employees and employment practices, he defends and resolves those disputes in line with the client’s goals and expectations.

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Portions of Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act Enjoined by Texas Federal Court – Majority of Regulation Remains Intact

In May 2016, the Office of Civil Rights (“OCR”) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“DHHS”) issued a Final Rule implementing Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”).  Section 1557 prohibits “covered entities” from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability.  The term “covered entities” includes all health care providers that receive payments from the federal government (e.g.,. Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Affairs, TRICARE).

The requirements of the Section 1557 Regulation are sweeping.  The law requires providers to adopt nondiscrimination policies, provide free language assistance to individuals with limited English proficiency, and accommodate individuals with disabilities.  Under the law, providers must also post a specific notice of their nondiscrimination policies and inform patients that they will provide language assistance free of charge to patients with limited English proficiency.  Health care providers with more than fifteen employees are required to adopt a patient discrimination grievance policy and appoint a civil rights coordinator who will oversee implementation of the law’s requirements and investigate and issue decisions relating to patients’ allegations of discrimination.

The Section 1557 Regulation also for the first time creates binding rules that define sex discrimination to include discrimination on the basis of gender identity.  These rules require providers to treat patients based on the patient’s preferred gender.  These new rules also require providers to amend their policies on the boarding of transgendered patients and the use of public facilities, such as bathrooms, to ensure equal treatment to transgendered patients based on their stated gender identity.

In addition to these new requirements, the Section 1557 Regulation requires nondiscrimination in the treatment of female patients including treatment and coverage decisions based on pregnancy status.  One notable requirement of the law precludes providers from treating female patients differently on the basis of the patient’s decision to terminate a pregnancy.

On December 31, 2016, Judge Reed O’Connor of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas issued a nationwide injunction halting the implementation of the portions of the law that govern the treatment of transgendered patients as well as rules that would bar discrimination in treatment and coverage of female patients on the basis of their decision to terminate a pregnancy.  Until the court determines whether DHHS had the authority to create these legal requirements, these portions of the Regulation are not enforceable.  You can read the entire decision here.

Providers that have read the news coverage of this recent decision should be aware that all of the other requirements of the law remain intact.  Violations of the remaining provisions of the regulation continue to be subject to investigation and regulatory action by the  Office of Civil Rights, which has the authority to terminate a provider’s participation in Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE for violations of the law.  Providers also continue to be subject to private discrimination lawsuits filed by patients for alleged violations of Section 1557.

If you are a health care provider and are not familiar with the requirements of Section 1557 or have not taken steps to comply with the law, you should quickly take steps to ensure that you become compliant with the law as soon as possible to avoid the risk of an OCR investigation or a lawsuit being filed by current patient.

If you have any questions please feel free to reach out directly to Robb Leandro at RobbLeandro@parkerpoe.com  or 919.835.4636.

Robb Leandro

Robb Leandro

Robb Leandro assists his client with a broad range of legal issues relating to health care, administrative law and public policy. His legal practice focuses on helping health care providers navigate the minefield of regulations that they face in their practices. Robb routinely assists his clients with issues including Medicaid and Medicare regulations; Medicaid and Medicare audits; Certificate of Need Applications and litigation; licensure, surveys, and certification issues; and HIPAA and privacy laws. Robb also provides counsel to health care providers with complex government contract procurement issues.

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